Conferences > Conference 2008

Conference 2008

The University of Oklahoma Libraries
Present

The 25th Annual Conference
The Emerging Research Library:
Our Role in the Digital Future

front

March 6 and 7, 2008

Embassy Suites Hotel, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

The hotel is reserving a number of rooms at a special conference rate
if reserved by February 20, 2008.
Complimentary transportation is available to and from the airport.
Please contact the hotel directly at (405) 682-6000 for reservations.

For additional information please contact:
Rhonda Cannon, Conference Coordinator, (405) 325-2611.

calendar  Registration deadline: February 15, 2008  calendar

CONFERENCE PROGRAM: Thursday, March 6, 2008


tall Conference Welcome
Sul H. Lee, Dean
University of Oklahoma Libraries


goldclocksmall 1:00–2:15 p.m.
Lizabeth (Betsy) A. Wilson
Dean of University Libraries

University of Washington

Local to Global: The Emerging Research Library
Research, scholarship, and discovery have been transformed by the internet and communication technologies across all sectors on a global basis. The rapid dissemination of findings, the creation of new tools and platforms for information manipulation, and open access to research data have rendered the more traditional institution-based library approaches to providing access to information inadequate. This paper will examine collective choices and strategies needed to move local collections and services to a global scale in the emerging research library


goldclocksmall 2:15-3:00 p.m.
Mary Case
University Librarian

University of Illinois at Chicago Libraries

Partners in Knowledge Creation: An Expanded Role for Research Libraries in the Digital Future
Libraries have always been involved in the creation of new knowledge by ensuring that the knowledge of the past is collected, organized, made accessible and preserved for coming generations. While these traditional roles continue, the digital world provides the opportunity for librarians to be more actively engaged in the creation process itself. This activity ranges from the creation of metadata to the development of repositories to the publication of scholarly work. These new roles are essential to the future of the library. Only by integrating the skills and values of librarians with the work of scholars and the expertise of technologists can we ensure long-term access to scholarship and the continued relevance of libraries.


coffeecup
3:00-3:30 p.m.
Coffee Break
YBP Library Services



bishop6goldclocksmall 3:30-4:15 p.m.
Lori A. Goetsch
Dean of Libraries

Kansas State University

Reinventing Our Work: New and Emerging Roles for Academic Librarians
Technology, globalization, and increasing competition for students, faculty, and research dollars have significantly affected the teaching and research efforts on our campuses. In response to meeting new and emerging user needs, libraries are crafting new roles and responsibilities for librarians by both reinventing more traditional positions as well as creating new job roles that require skill sets that, at present, are not learned through library and information science education and training. This paper will examine the impacts, benefits, and tensions that this changing workforce has on academic libraries, with a particular focus on a content analysis of selected job vacancy announcements in the last decade.


goldclocksmall 4:15-5:00 p.m.
Kevin M. Guthrie
President

Ithaka

Attitudes and Behaviors in the Field of Economics: Anomaly or Leading Indicator?
This paper will explore the challenges and opportunities that libraries face in the digital world from the perspective of a single disciplinary field: economics. Through analysis of faculty surveys, interviews with economists, and assessment of the impact of new digital resources and services that have emerged to support the field, we will highlight how the behaviors and attitudes of this field have changed in a very short period of time. What kind of services do the economists need from libraries, and perhaps more importantly, from librarians? Are the changes in behavior of economists over the last decade, which have been characterized by a dramatic reduction in their dependence on the traditional library, anomalous and specific to the field, or are they predictive? What might this mean for the choices that librarians must make in order to support scholarship?


5:00 p.m.
Reception
EBSCO Information Services


CONFERENCE PROGRAM: Friday, March 7, 2008


night goldclocksmall 8:30-9:15 a.m.
Jack Siggins
University Librarian

George Washington University Library

Unintended Consequences: A Friendly User Looks at User-Friendly Digitization
In 1997 a revolutionary discovery in digital data storage was quietly introduced to the world of computer technology, not by American scientists, but by two Europeans working separately. In the intervening ten years, hard-drive capacity increased a hundred fold and is still growing. This leap in digital capacity, accompanied by other technological advances, has placed us on the cusp of a period of even greater cultural transformation. As we race headlong into this future, rapid innovation, followed by equally rapid obsolescence, challenges academic administrators every day to make decisions involving technology that make them uneasy. This paper discusses the implications of some of the major changes in academic technology and identifies possible pitfalls for research libraries arising from this transformation.


goldclocksmall 9:15-10:00 a.m.
Heather Joseph
Executive Director

The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)

Open Access: Caveat Emptor
The number of ""Open Access (OA)"" scholarly publishing options continues to expand at a dizzying pace. The Directory of Open Access Journals has consistently reported new OA titles being added to its roster at the sustained pace of more than one new title each day for the past several years. Publishers, large and small, commercial and not-for-profit, now routinely announce new OA options for authors. Yet often, what is offered to authors is simply expanded access, and not full OA. This paper will examine the proliferation of OA publishing options, and outline key conditions that should exist for authors to be confident that what they are purchasing truly does ensure Open Access to their work.


coffeecup
10:00-10:30 a.m.
Coffee Break
Gale, a part of Cengage Learning


grggoldclocksmall 10:30-11:15 a.m.
Sarah M. Pritchard
Charles Deering McCormick University Librarian

Northwestern University

Deconstructing the Library: Reconceptualizing Collections, Spaces and Services
As scholarship becomes evermore digitally driven, the communication of peer-reviewed research results has undergone a dramatic transformation. The Internet has created an unprecedented environment where these results can be immediately and broadly shared. As researchers, funders and policy makers become aware of the opportunities afforded by faster and wider sharing of research results, access policies are evolving accordingly. From policies focusing primarily on protecting this material from unauthorized users, we are now seeing a proliferation of policies designed to leverage the value of research results by sharing them as widely as possible. This paper will examine the rapid evolution of access policies designed to create a more inclusive scholarly communications playing field.


goldclocksmall 11:15-12:00 p.m.
Deborah Jakubs
Rita DiGiallonardo Holloway University Librarian and Vice Provost for Library Affairs

Duke University

Out of the Gray Times: Leading Libraries into the Digital Future
Past practices, policies, and staffing patterns have served as a solid foundation for research libraries. New challenges require a fresh - and very different - look at much of what we have taken for granted over decades. This presentation will discuss the changes in philosophy, organizational models, and recruitment that are needed to reposition libraries for the digital future.


Conference Organizers

CONFERENCE CHAIRMAN
Sul H. Lee

Dean, University of Oklahoma Libraries



CONFERENCE COORDINATOR
Rhonda Cannon

Director of Administrative Services



CONFERENCE COMMITTEE
Susan Russell, Ila Coffman, Matt Stock


Speakers

Mary Case
University Librarian
University of Illinois at Chicago Libraries

Lori A. Goetsch
Dean of Libraries
Kansas State University

Kevin M. Guthrie
President
Ithaka

Deborah Jakubs
Rita DiGiallonardo Holloway University Librarian
and Vice Provost for Library Affairs
Duke University

Heather Joseph
Executive Director
The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)

Sarah M. Pritchard
Charles Deering McCormick University Librarian
Northwestern University

Jack Siggins
University Librarian
George Washington University Library

Lizabeth (Betsy) A. Wilson
Dean of University Libraries
University of Washington


REGISTRATION FORM

Name _____________________________________________________________
Title _____________________________________________________________
Library _____________________________________________________________
Address _____________________________________________________________
  _____________________________________________________________
E-Mail _____________________________________________________________
Registration Closes February 15, 2008.
Registration fee $225 (U.S. dollars)

Conference Committee reserves the right to
cancel the Conference prior to February 1, 2008.

No refunds will be given for cancellations after March 1, 2008.

Make checks payable to the University of Oklahoma.

Mail this form with your check to:
Rhonda Cannon
The University of Oklahoma Libraries
401 West Brooks Street
Norman, OK 73019-6030

http://oldlibrary.ou.edu/conference


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