Conferences > Conference 2011

Conference 2011

The University of Oklahoma Libraries Presents

The 28th Annual Conference
From Surviving to Thriving: Building Blocks of Success


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March 3 and 4, 2011

Embassy Suites Hotel, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

The Embassy Suites Hotel is reserving a number of rooms at a
special conference rate if reserved by February 22, 2011.
Complimentary transportation is available to and from the airport.
Please contact the hotel directly at (405) 682-6000 for reservations
or go to Embassy Suites website (Group/Convention Code: OUL)

For additional information please contact:
Sarah Robbins, Conference Coordinator, (405)325-2611.

calendar  Registration deadline: February 22, 2011  calendar

Conference Program: Thursday, March 3, 2011


conf_img1 Conference Welcome
Sul H. Lee, Dean
Peggy V. Helmerich Chair
University of Oklahoma Libraries


goldclocksmall 1:00–1:45 p.m.
Rush G. Miller
Hillman University Librarian

University of Pittsburgh

Damn the Recession: Full Speed Ahead
Academic libraries have undergone an evolutionary change as emerging technologies have impacted operations and services during the past two decades. For much of this period, increasing budgets have enabled libraries to keep pace with needed change. For the past two years, many academic libraries have lost significant funding due to the economic recession. Coping with the need to increase commitment to emerging roles in scholarly communication in order to remain relevant to the academic enterprise, the challenges faced today are threatening to undermine the progress of recent years. This paper argues that it is not a time for retrenchment and timidity but for expansion and boldness for academic libraries. The library that thrives, even in the midst of a recession, will be the one which seizes the opportunity to re-design itself for the future.

goldclocksmall 1:45-2:30 p.m.
Joan Giesecke
Dean of Libraries

University of Nebraska – Lincoln Libraries

The Value of Partnership: Building New Partnerships for Success
In today’s economy, higher education institutions are struggling to maintain quality while functioning with fewer resources. For libraries, the economic situation is compounded by the impact of an information marketplace that is characterized by prices for resources that increase at 7 to 10% per year, and by near, and actual monopolies, controlling content. Added to the complexities of the marketplace are the demands of a faculty and student body that prefer individual actions to group efforts. These economic and social issues can become barriers to innovation, quality improvement, and successful services for today’s libraries. One way to combat the economic and social environment is by creating new and improved partnerships to leverage resources and share expertise in order to provide better services and access to wider collections. However, forming partnerships is not easy. This paper will review the characteristics of successful partnership as developed by the Gallup Corporation and will show how these values can be used in the academic library environment to create opportunities for success.




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goldclocksmall 3:00-3:45 p.m.
Lizabeth (Betsy) Wilson
Dean of University Libraries

University of Washington

Creating Sustainable Futures for Academic Libraries
According to Wikipedia (that source of all knowledge and wisdom), sustainability is the “capacity to endure.” In ecology, the word describes how biological systems remain diverse and productive over time. For humans, it is the potential for one’s long-term well being. For higher education and academic libraries, sustainability may well require a radical recalibration of their historic value proposition. The “Great Recession” has accelerated profound changes in higher education funding and in the perception of higher education as a public good. Instead of collectively staring at our feet in economic paralysis, can libraries use scarcity to fuel the imagination? Can the singular strengths of libraries boost the ability of higher education to thrive, not merely survive? Ultimately, how might libraries increase revenue, engender flexibility, foster collaboration, align activities, reduce costs, strengthen infrastructure, and encourage innovation? In doing so, can libraries create a sustainable academic business plan that ensures that libraries will not merely endure, but rapidly adapt and innovate? This paper will consider these questions by using the University of Washington’s experiences as a framework.


goldclocksmall 3:45-4:30 p.m.
James Mullins
Dean of Libraries

Purdue University Libraries

Are MLS Graduates Being Prepared for the Changing and Emerging Roles that Librarians Must Now Assume within Research University Libraries?
Every day we hear about the dynamic, changing role of the research university library as it prepares to meet the challenges of the 21st century. However, have recent MLS graduates been exposed to what this changing world is and do they know how research university libraries are responding? Are they being prepared for the new roles being created for librarians within research libraries? These questions along with others will be explored through a survey of directors, deans, and university librarians at ARL institutions. The findings of this research will be the basis for this paper.


conf_img3 goldclocksmall 4:30-5:15 p.m.
Brinley Franklin
Vice Provost, University Libraries

University of Connecticut Libraries

Advancing the Institutional Mission
How will academic research libraries respond effectively to rapid technological advances, changes in user behavior, the proliferation of information available through non-traditional delivery mechanisms and formats, and a difficult economic climate? In order to thrive in this changing and challenging environment, academic research libraries must demonstrate their value in ways that other campus stakeholders understand. More than ever, libraries have to move away from defining themselves and their value simply in terms of library services and collections; indeed, few members of the academic community currently expect their libraries to acquire, process, and preserve traditional print collections. Instead, libraries are challenged not just to support, but to advance the fundamental missions of the academic enterprise in new ways. Academic libraries must employ multiple approaches to show their value in advancing the institutional mission.



Conference Program: Friday, March 4, 2011


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goldclocksmall 8:15-9:00 a.m.
David Spadafora
President and Librarian

The Newberry Library

Short-term Changes for Long-term Benefits
The financial and economic crisis that started simmering in 2007 and came to a full boil in late 2008 affected organizations of every kind, including independent research libraries large and small. Having just completed long-term, strategic planning, the Newberry Library found itself having to make big adjustments to carefully crafted plans in just a few weeks. These remarks explore how the Newberry’s response to this crisis, despite much institutional pain, has strengthened it considerably – and what some of its independent peers have done at the same time.


goldclocksmall 9:00-9:45 a.m.
Bernard F. Reilly
President
Center for Research Libraries

Global Resources: How a Cooperative Collection Development Enterprise Keeps Pace with a Rapidly Changing World
The Global Resources Program was established in December 1996, with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Association of Research Libraries and the Association of American Universities. Now based at Center for Research Libraries, Global Resources, a collaborative initiative of more than fifty academic research institutions, supports international studies through the preservation and exchange of knowledge and source materials. This presentation will describe how, over the last fifteen years, Global Resources has evolved and adapted to radical changes in the technology landscape and the information marketplace.




conf_img6 goldclocksmall 10:15-11:00 a.m.
Tim Collins
President

EBSCO Publishing

Budgets, Services and Technology Driving Change—How Librarians, Publishers and Vendors are Moving Forward
The economic downturn and continuing budget concerns have libraries, publishers and vendors making strategic changes as they seek to provide a high-level of services at a time when uncertainty continues to dominate planning and development. Creative thinking has become the norm as organizations seek to challenge long-held views and uncover and implement needed changes. Librarians, publishers, and vendors have all experienced a period of assessment, strategic review and reaction as a result of the continued evolution from a print-based model to one dominated by electronic dissemination of scholarly information and the new role eBooks promise to play. This presentation addresses some of the important actions taken by librarians, publishers and vendors to cope with changes forced by both the economy and budget pressures, by the continued migration of scholarly resources to electronic formats and by current and planned eBook activities and new eBooks models. It explores patterns in library content selection and spending trends, publisher prices and pricing models, as well as vendor strategies and tactics challenging and changing times.


goldclocksmall 11:00-11:45 p.m.
Paula Kaufman
Juanita J. and Robert E. Simpson Dean of Libraries

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Let’s Get Cozy: Evolving Collaborations in the 21st Century
Early last decade I predicted that the 21st century would see fewer library consortia that would be larger in size and scope and more powerful than they were at the time, and that there would also be many new types of partnerships and collaborative activities that would extend and enhance access for our users. As new digital technologies make the storage of redundant print copies less important, as strained budgets can support fewer subject specialists, and as demands for new services such as data stewardship rise, it is clearer now than ever that libraries’ traditional consortia and our traditional place and roles within the academic institutions must be rethought and changed expeditiously if academic libraries are to continue to be vitally important. This article explores this concept and offers some possible models for collaboration.

goldclocksmall 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Barbara Dewey
Dean, University Libraries & Scholarly Communications

Pennsylvania State University Libraries

In Transition: The Special Nature of Leadership Change
Research libraries are in a time of major transitions and changes. Research library leadership is also transitioning. This paper will define transition, explore its many manifestations, and provide strategies and tools for institutions and individuals dealing with transitional environments. Transition provides special opportunities and challenges for research libraries moving forward, not only at the administrative level, but at all levels of the organization.


Conference Organizers

CONFERENCE CHAIRMAN
Sul H. Lee, Dean

Peggy V. Helmerich Chair
University of Oklahoma Libraries



CONFERENCE COORDINATOR
Sarah Robbins

Web Services Coordinator & Public Relations Officer
University of Oklahoma Libraries



CONFERENCE COMMITTEE
James Bierman, Janet Croft, Starla Doescher




CONFERENCE SPONSORS
EBSCO Information Services
Gale, part of Cengage Learning
Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Inc.
Unlimited Priorities Corporation
YBP Library Services



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Speakers

Tim Collins
President
EBSCO Publishing

Barbara Dewey
Dean, University Libraries & Scholarly Communications
Pennsylvania State University Libraries

Brinley Franklin
Vice Provost, University Libraries
University of Connecticut Libraries

Joan Giesecke
Dean of Libraries
University of Nebraska – Lincoln Libraries

Paula Kaufman
Juanita J. and Robert E. Simpson Dean of Libraries
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Rush G. Miller
Hillman University Librarian
University of Pittsburgh

James Mullins
Dean of Libraries
Purdue University Libraries

Bernard F. Reilly
President
Center for Research Libraries

David Spadafora
President and Librarian
The Newberry Library

Lizabeth (Betsy) Wilson
Dean of University Libraries
University of Washington


The University of Oklahoma Libraries presents
From Surviving to Thriving: Building Blocks for Success

March 3 and 4, 2011

Embassy Suites Hotel, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Contact the Embassy Suites Hotel by February 22, 2011 at (405) 682-6000 for reservations
or visit their website (Group/Convention Code: OUL).

REGISTRATION FORM

Name_____________________________________________________________
Title_____________________________________________________________
Library_____________________________________________________________
Address_____________________________________________________________
 _____________________________________________________________
E-Mail_____________________________________________________________
Registration closes February 22, 2011.
Registration fee $225 (U.S. dollars)

Conference committee reserves the right to
cancel the conference prior to February 4, 2011.

No refunds will be given for cancellations after March 1, 2011.

Make checks payable to the University of Oklahoma.

Mail this form with your check to:
Library Dean's Office
The University of Oklahoma Libraries
401 West Brooks Street
Norman, OK 73019-6030

http://libraries.ou.edu/conferences


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